The Process of Writing Without Ambiguity.

Even the newspapers have their awkward word choice from time to time.

Read the very end of this article about a retired gentleman who studied for, and participated in, a history class just for the pleasure of learning.

“As for his future, “Jack” has no plans to go full time and, say, join a fraternity. But, come January, he will be back in the classroom. To study the Great Depression. And to inspire those who meet him in the process.”

You may immediately criticize the use of ‘but’ and ‘and’ to begin sentences. Traditionalists may stick to the rules, even though this use is commonly accepted in everyday speech.
Let’s leave that debate in the style wars for another post.

What does the final phrase ‘in the process’ mean to you?

One option is that Jack’s return to the classroom in itself is inspirational.
Alternately, Jack’s dedication to studying could be what’s inspiring.

Moving “in the process” and rewriting the sentence solves the ambiguity and addresses the (potentially) problematic use of ‘but’ and ‘and’.

To preserve the article’s conversational style, I’ll keep the sentences short.
“In January, he will return to the classroom. To study the Great Depression. And, in the process, inspire others who meet him.”

For more formal writing, I would combine the sentences:
“In January, he will return to the classroom to study the Great Depression and, in the process, inspire others who meet him.”

Depending on your goals, a conversational style and bending the rules of grammar, may be appropriate. Just make sure that your message is clear, otherwise your reader may become mired in ambiguity and get frustrated.